“This Is the Most Expensive Meat Experiment We’ve Ever Done” — Prime Time

“This Is the Most Expensive Meat Experiment We’ve Ever Done” — Prime Time


– A porchetta is usually a whole loin and belly section of a pig. We thought “Why the heck has “nobody ever done that with beef?” So, we’re gonna give it a
shot today; see how it goes. – We’ve never seen this done, ever. So, we have no idea really what we’re doing, other than we’re done a porchetta a bunch. I tried to find videos of this
online; couldn’t find any. We’re really trying something new. – Our rib-eye steaks are this section, right here is our New York strip steaks, underneath this fat is our
tenderloin, two skirt steaks, under that, a bavette and a flank steak. This whole section is
the rest of the ribs. – So what we’re gonna try
and do by doing with beef, is take that same fatty
outer layer of beef, wrap it around the rib-eye
and the New York strip, and what we think we’re
gonna get is a really nice, tender outer fatty layer of short ribs, and a really nice
medium-rare beautiful rib-eye and New York strip. – Also worth mentioning
is that a porchetta, with pork, because pigs
ae so much smaller, is about half the size of this. So that’s why it’s
something that you can do. Beef usually isn’t cut this way, so this is not the easiest thing to do. – It’s just gonna be getting the bones off and getting this thing rolled up. First thing to come off
is gonna be all this fat. If you listen closely, you can hear it. We would also not normally cut like this, this is just so you can see everything. It is harder to do this way. This is for all those
YouTube commenters saying that we don’t know what we’re doing. – Yeah. Turns out, we don’t. (energetic music) – We have rib-eye, short ribs, two skirts, flank, bavette, New York Strips, tenderloin, sirloin, picanha, tri-tip, entrana; there are 11 steaks
going into this one roast. – Woo-hoo! – A lot of these steaks cook
at different temperatures, so how are we going to manage
to cook them all properly? We’re gonna cook this kind of
low and slow for a little bit, because the main thing is getting the short ribs to get tender. The outer steaks, I think, like the flank, the skirt, are gonna be more
well-done, but that’s okay. Brent, would you like to address the bith commenters out there? The bith commenters of the world? – Why don’t you make like a tree, and get the hell outta here? Bones are out. Tidy this up. Figure out how the hell
we’re gonna roll this. (energetic music) – [Ben] In an ideal
world, you would want this to just sit and salt for like a day. – [Brent] We ain’t go that kinda time. – The best part about the salting process is you will find every cut
on your hands really quickly. (energetic music) – [Brent] The purpose of
tying a roast is just that it actually cooks evenly, so that
everything is the same size. – How long you think we’re gonna need timing-wise for this guy? – I think we can do this in six hours. – We’re playing by Price
is Right rules, right? – Yep. – And I like to make
mine seven and a half. – [Brent] Let’s season the outside. (Brent laughs excitedly) – We’re putting this in the
smoker, but we ain’t smoking it. Just wanna keep it at a
nice, low temperature. I’ve never had a roast that actually took two people to lift it up. – I’m really curious what
this actually weighs. – I’m gonna say… 45 pounds. 60 pounds. 61 pounds. – I’m really freaking stoked
about this whole thing. I think it’s gonna be awesome. – Let’s do it. (energetic music) This is (bleep) ridiculous. – Yep. – Now we wait. To the computers! To solitaire! I really gotta get more sleep. (whistling) It’s seven o’clock, so it’s
been seven hours in the smoker. It’s 130 degrees, so it’s gonna
be pretty much medium-rare. It’ll probably shoot up
another five to ten degrees. We have with us our
good friend John Perry. – Hey John Perry! – Because someone had to
carry the very cumbersome, awkward, heavy board that
we’re gonna put this on, and I didn’t wanna do it. Ready? Oh, that’s a heavy (bleep) roast. (energetic music) – Hansean! – [Brent] We’ve definitely roasted it. – [Ben] It cooked. (Brent laughs) – It should probably
rest for about an hour. – It tipped at 130. – Which is little more than medium-rare, but I think with the
carry-over, I think medium is actually a good place to be with this, so that the short ribs actually
got a little extra time, so that they’re a little bit more tender. We’re not worried about
the steaks being tender. They’re gonna be amazing either way. – A good marriage is about
compromise, and I think the loin, the short ribs, meeting in the middle… – What else is a good marriage about? – Okay, now I’m really excited about that. I’m really excited about that. – We’re exercising a stupid
amount of patience right now. – Eat me Brent, eat me! – I wanna eat you, I do! Just do it! – I do, buddy! – Where do you think your
favorite part’s gonna be on this? Call your shot, call your shot. – I think the best part is gonna be this part of the rib-eye,
but I’m most excited about all of the streaks
from the drop loin being wrapped around the New York strip, because I’ve never eaten that before. – I’m really curious how
the short rib exterior has been cooked, and how far along it got compared to the rib-eye
right in the middle. – What if it sucks? – I don’t think it will. – Great, so let’s give it an hour? – Let’s give it an hour. (energetic music) We’re ready to cut into this thing. Brent, would you like to have the honors? – Ben… I would. – [Ben] Oh (bleep) yeah, okay. – [Brent] It worked.
– [Ben] That worked. That was the most expensive
experiment that paid off that we’ve ever done, congratulations. – Thank God! The short rib is all mid-well; we wanted that to cook all the way through so that all the fat would actually render, and we wanted the rib-eye
to stay medium-rare. I think it looks (bleep) awesome. – [Ben] Let’s cut a slice. – [Brent] This is super exciting,
because at a steakhouse, you get the prime rib. The prime rib is the whole rib loin, which is usually just this cut. This is so much more; this
actually shows the whole animal, so I’m so excited to eat it. – [Ben] Which do you want
first? Do you want the– – [Brent] I want the short rib. – [Ben] The short rib? – [Brent] Yeah. – That’s great. – You usually have braised short rib, which is tender and juicy and falls apart, but tastes like red wine or rosemary. This actually tastes like roast beef, but well-done roast beef
that’s super-duper fatty. It’s amazing. We should try the rib-eye now? – Yeah, let’s do that. That was a (bleep) perfect prime rib. That’s a really perfect prime rib. – Then it’s just simple,
perfect prime rib. – What do you want from us? We just make it perfect. – [Brent] This is amazing.
This is an amazing experience. – Turns out it was a good idea. – You can make a beef porchetta, you just need a bigger name for it. – Beefchetta? Thank God it’s not just
the two of us eating this. We invited a bunch of friends; they’re gonna start helping us. – Let’s do some damage. (energetic music) – For more episodes like this, click here. – This is fun as hell. – [Brent] So it looks pretty good…

100 thoughts on ““This Is the Most Expensive Meat Experiment We’ve Ever Done” — Prime Time”

  1. That’s exactly how any butcher cuts on something… it’s not to so the camera could see, it’s just how you get leverage.

  2. Dude, why are guys cutting that massive roast with semi flex boning knives!? BRING OUT THE 12 INCH CIMETER!!!! At least a butcher's knife! Edit: nevermind they did pull out the big boy lol.

  3. there is no such thing as an original thought. While procrastianting on work today (July) I was thinking Prime Rib or Porchetta for Christmas holidays…then I thought "Can you do a beef Porchetta? A Beefchetta? No. You couldnt! To the computer!" Sure enough you magnificent buggers got it done months ago! AMAZING!

  4. Possibly could have rested even longer, lost a lot of juice on the board, still looks absolutley amazing boys! Keep it up!!

  5. The skin on porchetta is delicious. It bubbles and shatters like glass when done right. The skin on this beef roast looked inedible.

  6. Ciao Ragazzi,
    In Italian
    Beef = Manzo
    Thus it would be "porchetta di manzo"
    it would not be "Manzetta" as that means heifer….

  7. This looks delicious but the number of times these guys touch the roast with their bare hands drives me crazy. Also, what the hell did they do with all that meat?

  8. Throughout this whole video I imagined them preparing and cooking a human being. it was so uncomfortable, but I couldn't stop laughing for some reason.

  9. What's the difference of just drinking the animals blood after adding some salt-n-pepper than eating a raw steak? Raw is raw.

  10. This series have perfect balance in that it makes me hungry looking at all this meat, and that dudes disgusting mustache makes me lose my appetite.

  11. Cooking delicious meal never been so easy and fun! I just discovered Vremi Pre-Season Pan and it is amazing. It fries perfectly, fast, tasty, not burning, meat, fish, veggie become delicious! Totally love it and recommend to everyone! https://www.amazon.com/Vremi-Pre-Seasoned-Cast-Square-Grill/dp/B01INE7T94?ref_=ast_sto_dp/?&_encoding=UTF8&tag=genie005-20

  12. I dunno what uses for this turns me on more:

    Cutting out a nice big slab to just dig right into.

    Or possibly chilling and thin slicing for a rad ass sammy

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