President Obama sits down for lunch with letter writers in Milwaukee

President Obama sits down for lunch with letter writers in Milwaukee


Brent Brown: For me, to be
able to sit here with you is an honor for me, but
more importantly, I of course really want to
— it doesn’t matter exactly what I do, what
I did, etcetera, but that you really
did save my life. And that the people
that are around me, and who are very republican
in nature as well have seen that. And I have gone
forth into this city. I love talking to people. The President: You’re
spreading the word. Brent Brown: Like,
Dave, who parked my car, and the lady who
helped me at Kohls. Her name is Kimberly, okay? But I was really interested
to hear if I was the only one. And I am not the only one. And there are people in this
city, and in this nation, who no one really
hears from, and they’re very impacted
in a positive way. So — The President: Well,
that means a lot. It really does. It makes me feel gratified. And the — how, if you
don’t mind me asking — Brent Brown: Sure. Ask away. The President: — how long
is the treatment process? Is it sort of a well-defined
thing, or is it one that — Brent Brown: It
should be done. As of right now. The President:
Congratulations. Brent Brown: I had my last
surgery about a month ago. So, still recovering
from all of that. The President: You
look great, though. Brent Brown: Much better. I was on death’s doorstep. See, I’m not being
hyperbolistic in my speech. It is — that is where I
was, and now I am here. My name is Brent Brown. To be clear: I have never
voted for President Obama, ever. I am a Republican
who cursed his name. Who falsely accused him, and
someone who zealously worked to insure that he would
never be my President. Female Speaker: (inaudible) (laughter) Brent Brown: — but
thanks to his fortitude, thanks to his unwavering
vision of mercy, even towards me, this chump
gets a second shot at life. (applause) The President: Part of
what happens, you know, in our politics, is the
filters through which people receive information
are so cloudy. And this is true, both on
the left and on the right. And I always say this, I
said this at the State of the Union. When you meet people
outside of Washington, you really don’t go around
asking “Are any of you Republican, or Democrat?” if you’re coaching
little league, or if you’re in this
church, or what have you. You’re just focused on is
this person a good person? Are they treating
people with respect? And when people listen, it
turns out that they have a lot more in common
than they have apart. But it does require us
getting the facts in. And so I — Brent Brown: I find out
when you have two people of opposing viewpoints who are
willing to listen and then speak, be slow to speak,
be very quick to listen, you can really come up with
some good ideas that you could not if you were
only of one persuasion. Thank you. Thanks. Female Speaker:
God bless you. That was awesome,
what you said. Brent Brown: Thanks. The President: I want to say
how much I appreciate Brent for sharing his story. When I received his letter,
it made a powerful impact for me because it was so
honest about the fact that he wasn’t a
supporter of mine. For him to be able to
express not what only he is going through personally,
but also reflect on what that means for the
rest of the country, and the rest of Wisconsin,
is extraordinary. Milwaukee, you have proved
that what Americans care about most is not scoring
political points, it’s looking
after each other. You’ve made a difference
in people’s lives.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *