Nutrient Transport in Soil After Winter Manure Application, Melanie Stock, WI

Nutrient Transport in Soil After Winter Manure Application, Melanie Stock, WI


Hi, my name is Melanie stock, and I’m a peach to you soon in soil science at the University of wisconsin-madison I’m studying wintertime manure management, and so we’re specifically looking at liquid dairy manure Most small farms apply manure to the landscape as a method of disposal year-round and so there’s concerns about phosphorus losses in the runoff Because when manure is applied to the field in the winter the ground is frozen so it can’t be incorporated and oftentimes It’s applied right on top of snowpack and so upon melt in the spring there’s concern about Nutrient transport and so what we are testing here are actually very basic farming practices that we know relatively little about So we’re testing the effect of tillage No-till versus a conventional chisel plow As well as just the timing of those applications, so end of November early December Applications are are quite common for farmers and then also towards the end of January And so we’re looking at how those just little differences can impact Phosphorus losses and the runoff it looks like we have ten plots, but there’s actually Two plots per area of corn, so this is one pair of plots And if we walk down further it might be a little bit more obvious But we’re growing corn for silage. Just like a typical dairy farm would likely grow This summer has been our big installation year so we had excavators out here trenchers edgers bobcats because we had a lot of Instrumentation to install deep into the ground as well as for collecting our runoff at the surface The water gets funneled into the PVC pipe And then it enters this box and so there’s six five-gallon buckets here three per plot and what happens is each of these buckets is on a triangle that has to be perfectly level and So as this first gal this first bucket fills one twenty-fourth of the water. There’s twenty four of these little triangles cut 124th enters the second bucket and then so forth so another 124th enters The third bucket so we can track a 15 centimeter melt event which is quite a large event these are right now We’re refurbishing them, so there’s another bridge that empties right in But one of the very novel things that we’re working on here is that? This will allow us to calculate the total volume of the event But we really want to know the flow rate when does the event begin when does it end and how fast is the water moving? So I have here a load cell which I placed under one of the feet of the triangle and So it’s just all it is is just sensing a change in mass and so that allows me to know the flow rate it’s actually measuring one-third of the total mass of the bucket and So it’s a relatively simple method Where I’ve been working on is there’s a bit of electronic noise and the data, and so we’re working to Kind of automate a correction for that It’s We’ll have a datalogger. That’s ten data loggers to control our instrumentation our weather station has the data logger And then we’re actually looking at our dwee nose to control these have you heard of Arduino s? There they’re these little circuit boards they’re about $25 and they were invented so that anyone can use them So I for me there’s been a bit of a learning curve. You have to know how to program Oh a little bit, but it’ll read You can program it to read this value

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